Cbo Says Obamacare Fix Wouldn’t Do Much If Individual Mandate Is Repealed

If a bill to fix Obamacare’s cost-sharing reduction (CSR) payments were paired with a repeal of the health care law’s individual mandate, the CSR fix wouldn’t do much to lower premiums or increase coverage, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) says.

The budget scorekeeper said that previous estimates would remain roughly the same under the above scenario: 13 million fewer people would have coverage in 2027 and average premiums would rise by 10 percent in most years of the decade.

Read more at CBS

Republicans Privately Admit Defeat on Obamacare Repeal

For the first time, rank-and-file Republicans are acknowledging Obamacare may never be repealed.

After multiple failures to repeal the law, the White House and many GOP lawmakers are publicly promising to try again in early 2018. But privately, both House and Senate Republicans acknowledge they may never be able to deliver on their seven-year vow to scrap the law, reports Politico.

Read more at Politico

Only a Matter of Time Before GOP Fulfills Promise to Kill Obamacare

The problems created by ObamaCare will outlast the latest effort to repeal the bill. The GOP has not yet fulfilled its oft-repeated promise to repeal ObamaCare, and pundits are busy declaring that the GOP has failed for good. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Read more at The Hill

Obamacare Repeal Isn’t Really Dead

Against all odds, Republicans keep coming up with worse and worse health-care plans.

To be fair, though, it’s not entirely clear that we should even really call them that. Each of them has been more like a plan to have a plan—or, it’s hard to tell, maybe a plan to have a plan to have a plan—than an actual one. Indeed, House Republicans passed a health-care bill that President Trump himself thought was “mean” out of the expectation that the Senate would make it better. It didn’t. Instead, the Senate came within a vote of approving a bill that one of its supporters Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) called a “fraud” and a “disaster” in hopes that a conference committee with the House would yield something a little less “terrible.”

Read more at the Washington Post

Obamacare Repeal Bill Offers Both Enormous Flexibility and Uncertainty

The latest Republican proposal to undo the Affordable Care Act would grant states much greater flexibility and all but guarantee much greater uncertainty for tens of millions of people.

The legislation, proposed by two Senate Republicans, Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, would not only reduce the amount of federal funding for coverage over the next decade, but would also give states wide leeway to determine whom to cover and how. The result is a law that would be as disruptive as many of the Republicans’ previous proposals, but whose precise impact is the hardest to predict.

Read more at The New York Times

The Health 202: the New Gop Obamacare Repeal Effort Faces the Same Old Math

A small group of Republicans — led by Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy and South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham — appear convinced they can rework the equation to secure that ever-elusive 50th vote for their measure, finally passing a bill overhauling the Affordable Care Act with a tiebreaking vote from Vice President Pence and moving closer to their goal of repealing and replacing President Barack Obama’s health-care law.

There will be a lot of moving parts to watch this week. Republicans have asked the Congressional Budget Office to rush a score of the Graham-Cassidy bill, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s, R-Ky., office confirmed yesterday. McConnell plans to take the temperature of his leadership team and his entire conference over the next few days. They have only two weeks left to scrape together enough support, since the budget reconciliation bill they’re using expires at the end of the month.

Read more at The Washington Post

Obamacare: First Republican Healthcare Bill Fails in US Senate

The US Senate has rejected a Republican plan to replace President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare policy.

The 57-43 vote defeat marks the start of a days-long debate on a sweeping overhaul that critics fear could deny healthcare to millions of Americans.

The Better Care Reconciliation Act (BRCA) was crafted over two months but attention now turns to other options. President Donald Trump has urged senators to pass a bill, without indicating which one he supports.

A repeal-only bill, which would consign so-called Obamacare to history in two years, to give time to Republicans to devise a replacement, could be debated and voted on next. But that measure – which non-partisan analysts say will take health insurance from more than 30 million people – has already failed to win enough support in the Republican party.

Read more at the BCC

Republicans Unveil Revised Obamacare Repeal Bill

US Senate Republicans have released a revamped health bill in a bid to rally their divided party around its seven-year campaign to repeal Obamacare.

The plan retains key Obamacare taxes on the wealthy, while allowing insurers to offer less coverage and imposing sharp cuts to healthcare for the poor.

The new bill aims to woo Republicans of conservative and moderate factions.

Congress is delaying its summer holiday in a bid to overturn former President Barack Obama’s 2010 legislation.

Read more at the BBC

Obamacare Repeal Is Close. So Why Aren’t Conservative Groups More Galvanized?

Eight years after they organized en masse to kill Obamacare before it became law and helped Republicans take over Congress in the process, conservative activists are having trouble galvanizing around the GOP’s best and perhaps last chance to do away with the health care act.

Activists on the right have been outmatched in energy and enthusiasm by liberal groups at a critical legislative juncture. And the mounting worry among both the conservative groups and Republican lawmakers is that the debate over the future of health care in America may soon be irreparably painted in unfavorable terms, if it hasn’t been already.

Read more at The Daily Beast

Why Some Can’t Wait for a Repeal of Obamacare

For Linda Dearman, the House vote last week to repeal the Affordable Care Act was a welcome relief.

Ms. Dearman, of Bartlett, Ill., voted for President Trump largely because of his contempt for the federal health law. She and her husband, a partner in an engineering firm, buy their own insurance, but late last year they dropped their $1,100-a-month policy and switched to a bare-bones plan that does not meet the law’s requirements. They are counting that the law will be repealed before they owe a penalty.

“Now it looks like it will be, and we’re thrilled about that,” Ms. Dearman, 54, said. “We are so glad to feel represented for a change.”

Read more at The New York Times