Obamacare Repeal Isn’t Really Dead

Against all odds, Republicans keep coming up with worse and worse health-care plans.

To be fair, though, it’s not entirely clear that we should even really call them that. Each of them has been more like a plan to have a plan—or, it’s hard to tell, maybe a plan to have a plan to have a plan—than an actual one. Indeed, House Republicans passed a health-care bill that President Trump himself thought was “mean” out of the expectation that the Senate would make it better. It didn’t. Instead, the Senate came within a vote of approving a bill that one of its supporters Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) called a “fraud” and a “disaster” in hopes that a conference committee with the House would yield something a little less “terrible.”

Read more at the Washington Post

Republican Push to Repeal Obamacare Collapses

A Republican plan to replace Obamacare will not be voted on this week, effectively signalling its collapse.

The party leadership said the bill would not come to the Senate floor after a third “no” vote emerged.

Susan Collins said she could not back the “deeply flawed” bill, despite a call from President Donald Trump and promises of money for her state.

It was a major blow for the president and Republican leadership, who have made Obamacare’s repeal a top priority.

Read more at the BBC

Republicans Tweak Obamacare Repeal Bill, Support Tepid

Republican senators tried to gather more support on Monday for a last-ditch attempt to repeal Obamacare by revising funding provisions of their bill to make it more attractive to a handful of undecided lawmakers.

The outcome remained in doubt, with several senators in the party voicing concerns in recent days about the legislation to dismantle Democratic former President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare law.

Republican senators leading the effort on Monday released a revised version of their bill in hopes of finding more support.

Read more at Reuters

Obamacare Repeal Bill Offers Both Enormous Flexibility and Uncertainty

The latest Republican proposal to undo the Affordable Care Act would grant states much greater flexibility and all but guarantee much greater uncertainty for tens of millions of people.

The legislation, proposed by two Senate Republicans, Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, would not only reduce the amount of federal funding for coverage over the next decade, but would also give states wide leeway to determine whom to cover and how. The result is a law that would be as disruptive as many of the Republicans’ previous proposals, but whose precise impact is the hardest to predict.

Read more at The New York Times

The Health 202: the New Gop Obamacare Repeal Effort Faces the Same Old Math

A small group of Republicans — led by Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy and South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham — appear convinced they can rework the equation to secure that ever-elusive 50th vote for their measure, finally passing a bill overhauling the Affordable Care Act with a tiebreaking vote from Vice President Pence and moving closer to their goal of repealing and replacing President Barack Obama’s health-care law.

There will be a lot of moving parts to watch this week. Republicans have asked the Congressional Budget Office to rush a score of the Graham-Cassidy bill, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s, R-Ky., office confirmed yesterday. McConnell plans to take the temperature of his leadership team and his entire conference over the next few days. They have only two weeks left to scrape together enough support, since the budget reconciliation bill they’re using expires at the end of the month.

Read more at The Washington Post

Trump Says ‘Inaction Is Not an Option’ After Gop Senators Unveil Last-Gasp Obamacare Repeal Plan

  • President Trump criticizes Obamacare but does not appear to endorse a plan championed by Sens. Lindsey Graham and Bill Cassidy.
  • The senators introduced their last-ditch Obamacare repeal plan on Wednesday.
  • The GOP faces a Sept. 30 deadline to use budget rules to pass a health-care bill with only Republican votes.

 

Read more at CNBC